Everybody Was Finally Equal

The story “Harrison Burgeron” by Kurt Vonnegut is about a society that thinks everyone should be completely equal. This story applies to our society because we create sterio-types for different types of people, and then we expect everyone to fit under those sterio-types and be the way that we expect them to be. An example of this is the difference in the way we veiw smart kids and popular kids. When you think of someone that is really smart, you would imagine them as someone who spends all of their time working on school stuff, and has no friends and no life outside of school. You would basically imagine them as the sterio-typical ‘nerd’. While if you were to think of a really popular kid, you would probably imagine the sterio-typical popular kid. You would probably imagine someone who is super athletic, and who everyone loves and someone who is cool, good looking, not very smart, and super cocky. When thinking of sterio-types we basically think of the basic movie character of that type of person. The problem with sterio-types is that they are completely false and made up. People can be smart and popular at the same time, people are all their own person and have unique strengths and weakness. All people are different and come from a different background, so we can’t put people in categories. That is what makes life so exciting, there are so many different people to meet and become friends with, and none of them are the same.

 

6 thoughts on “Everybody Was Finally Equal

  1. I 100% agree i hate to say it, but I sometimes believe in stereotypes like the jock type. Has anyone ever stereotyped you?

  2. I like the pictures at the bottom. Haha. I totally agree that stereo types are completely made up, and basically useless! And to be honest, they can bring some people down!

  3. I like the way you put that last part, I for sure agree. And some sterio-types are true and some are false, we never know??

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