Are Books Dangerous?

The Nazis would burn books, and I don’t know actually why, but I have some ideas. I think they wanted books gone so nobody would get ideas, so that they will continue to love the Nazi government. If someone read the Hunger Games during world war II then they would get an idea of overthrowing the government or something. It would lead to some big problems. I think books can be dangerous because of the ideas and thoughts it can introduce. I think books are good still. Books are dangerous, and so are guns. It all depends on how you use things.  

What I look for in a Good Character

In my life the characters that I’ve enjoyed the most when I’ve read about in books usually are funny and strong/powerful. One example character is Gimli from the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. He is very stubborn,  smart with axes, and doesn’t like to admit that he is wrong. I like when a book shows the character’s thoughts. I enjoy a character if they are smart, funny, and powerful; even if they are an antagonist. When the author puts in personalities of characters it can help you connect to them. When there are good characters you can enjoy a book a lot more.

Word Nerd 1.12

Source: In the story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, on page 139, I found the word ultramarine.

Context: “For the walls were all richly gilded and were painted with very wonderful figures of saints and of angels, clad in ultramarine and crimson, and all those saints and angels were depicted playing upon various musical instruments that appeared to be made of gold.”

In Their Words: It means that it is a deep blue color pigment which was originally made by grinding lapis lazuli into a powder.

In My Words: A deep blue color from lapis lazuli.

Word Nerd 1.11

Source: In the book the story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, I found the word prowess on page 246.

Context: “And truly I make my vow that I have hardly ever seen a knight show such great prowess in arms as he.”

In Their Words: The word means skill or expertise in a particular activity or field.

In My Words: The word means skill in a certain activity.

 

Word Nerd 1.10

Source: In the story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, I found a word I had not heard before on page 117. The word was abashed.

Context: “For they were bemazed and abashed at the singular commands she had set upon them.”

In Their Words: The dictionary says the word means to make or have (someone) feel embarrassed, disconcerted, or ashamed.

In My Words: When someone feels embarrassed or ashamed.

Word Nerd 1.9

Source: I found a strange word in the story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle. The word was indignation, and was found on the page 117.

Context: ” And when they recovered from their amazement, they were inflamed with exceeding indignation that, for a time, they wist not whether that which they saw with their eyes was the light of day, or whether it was altogether darkness.”

In Their Words: The word indignation means anger or annoyance provoked by what is perceived as unfair treatment.
In My Words: Anger/annoyance provoked by what is thought of as being treated unfairly.

Word Nerd 1.8

Source: In the stories of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, I found the word brachet and didn’t know what it meant on page 272.

Context: “Now whiles they sat there feasting with great content of spirit, and with much mirth and goodly talk among themselves, there came of a sudden a great outcry from the woodland that was near by, and therewith there burst forth from the cover of that leafy wilderness a very beautiful white hart pursued by a white brachet of equal beauty.”

In Their Words: A female hunting hound that hunts by scent.

In My Words: A female hunting dog that uses scent to hunt.

Word Nerd 1.7

Source: I found the word hart in the book The Story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, page 272, and I was confused on what it meant.

Context: “Now whiles they sat there feasting with great content of spirit, and with much mirth and goodly talk among themselves, there came of a sudden a great outcry from the woodland that was near by, and therewith there burst forth from the cover of that leafy wilderness a very beautiful white hart pursued by a white brachet of equal beauty.”

In Their Words: The dictionary says that a hart is an adult male deer, especially a red deer over five years old.

In My Words: To me it just means another word for a adult deer.

What Power So Words Have?

Words help us send what we want others to know. Words can be small but with complicated meanings. The context to words help us understand the meaning of a word. A word big, small, or with other words can have small or HUGE impacts on others. The simple word no can bring up a long and harsh argument. The simple word thanks can make someone’s day better. I personally think words have immense power. Words can bring people together, make someone so happy, sad, mad, and all emotions. Words are emotion communicators. If I said I was happy, but I have a very sad frown then I wouldn’t be using the right emotion for the word.

Deep Thinker 1.6

Source: The story of King Arthur and his knights, by Howard Pyle, page 89.

Quote: “Then, lo! he was upon the instant transformed; for instead of the gardener’s boy there stood before the Lady Guinevere and here damsel the appearance of a noble young knight with hair and beard like threads of gold.”

Context: King Arthur was disguised as a garden boy and was found out by Lady Guinevere.

This Makes Me Think: Sometimes in life something so bland can be of great beauty. If you think about the “bland”  thing then it may become something with a more beautiful meaning. Example: When you get a present from your Grandma, but it is not what you wanted, and she put so much effort and love into this present that it makes you happy and you cherish it now. Remember to take a step back and think about the meaning of what happened or what you got.