Word nerd 2.1

Source: beautiful redemption Kami Garcia pg335

Word: After Ridley and Link bickered about holding hands.

In their words:

bicker

1

bik-er ]

verb (used without object)

to engage in petulant or peevish argument; wrangle:The two were always bickering.
to run rapidly; move quickly; rush; hurry:stream bickering down the valley.
to flicker; glitter:The sun bickered through the trees.

noun

an angry, petty dispute or quarrel; contention.
In my words: a stupid argument

Word nerd 1.12

source: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte page 216

Context:In that manner, Hareton who should be the first gentlemen in the neighborhood, was reduced to a state of complete dependence on his father’s inveterate enemy.

In their words: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/inveterate?s=t

inveterate

[in-vet-er-it]

adjective

settled or confirmed in a habit, practice, feeling, or the like:an inveterate gambler.
firmly established by long continuance, as a disease, habit, practice, feeling, etc.; chronic.
In my words: a habit

word nerd 1.11

Source: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte page 192

Context: Linton had certainly behaved provokingly; however, it was business of nobody but me;and I interrupted Mr. Heathcliff’s lecture,by telling him so.

In their words: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/provoke

provoke

[pruhvohk]

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verb (used with object), pro·voked, pro·vok·ing.

to anger, enrage, exasperate, or vex.
to stir up, arouse, or call forth (feelings, desires, or activity):The mishap provoked hearty laugh.
to incite or stimulate (a person, animal, etc.) to action.
to give rise to, induce, or bring about:What could have provoked such an incident?
Obsolete to summon.
In my words: to bring out something and exasperate it.

Word nerd 1.10

Source: Wuthering heights Emily Bronte page:139

Context:”Did you want anything, ma’am?”I inquired, still preserving my external composure, in spite of the ghastly countenance, and strange exaggerated manner.

In their words:

countenance

[koun-tn-uh ns]

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noun

verb (used with object), coun·te·nanced, coun·te·nanc·ing.

to permit or tolerate:You should not have countenanced his rudeness.
to approve, support, or encourage.
In my words: sadness that is visable in the face

word nerd 1.9

Source: Wuthering heights Emily Bronte page:139

Context:”Did you want anything, ma’am?”I inquired, still preserving my external composure, in spite of the ghastly countenance, and strange exaggerated manner.

In their words:

composure

[kuhm-poh-zher]

noun

serene, self-controlled state of mind; calmness; tranquillity:Despite the hysteria and panic around him, he retained his composure.
In my words: to have control over your mind to ease.

Word Nerd 1.8

Source: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte page:95

Context:Every Linton on the face of the earth might melt into nothing, before I could consent to forsake Healthcliff.

In their words:

forsake

[fawr-seyk]

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verb (used with object), for·sook, for·sak·en, for·sak·ing.

to quit or leave entirely; abandon; desert:She has forsaken her country for an island in the South Pacific.
to give up or renounce (a habit, way of life, etc.).
In my words:to leave somewhere or to stop something

Word Nerd 1.7

Source: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte page:95

Context:Every Linton on the face of the earth might melt into nothing, before I could consent to forsake Healthcliff.

In their words:

Linton

[lin-tn]
|

noun

Ralph, 1893–1953, U.S. anthropologist.
male given name.
In My words:a male name

word nerd 1.6

Source: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte pg 255

Context: As we walked home, I would fain enlightened my charge on the characters of the people we quitted;but she got it into her head that I was prejudiced against them.

In their words:

fain

[feyn]

adverb

gladly; willingly:He fain would accept.

adjective

content; willing:They were fain to go.
Archaic constrained; obliged:He was fain to obey his Lord.
Archaic glad; pleased.
Archaic desirous; eager.
In my words: to accept something

word nerd 1.5 appall

Source: Wuthering Heights pg:143

Context:I dread sleeping,my dreams appall me.

In their words:

appall

or ap·pal

[uhpawl]

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verb (used with object)

to fill or overcome with horror, consternation, or fear; dismay:He was appalled by the damage from the fire. I am appalled at your mistakes.
In my words: Scary and in shock

word nerd 1.4

Source:pg142 Wuthering Heights by: Emily Bronte

Context: “Don’t you see that face?” she inquired, gazing earnestly at the mirror.

In Their Words: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/inquire

inquire

[in-kwahyuhr]

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verb (used without object), in·quired, in·quir·ing.

to seek information by questioning; ask:to inquire about person.
to make investigation (usually followed by into ):to inquire into the incident.

verb (used with object), in·quired, in·quir·ing.

to seek to learn by asking:to inquire person’s name.
Obsolete to seek.
Obsolete to question (a person).

Verb Phrases

inquire after to ask about the state of health or condition of:Friends have been calling all morning to inquire after yout.
My words: To ask or to get information.